7 novembre 2018  6:30 PM – 10:00 PM GMT+0
Politique

Données ouvertes et droits numériques

Description disponible en anglais uniquement.

What makes FWD50 so interesting is that it is an attempt to break through a flawed binary discourse around the interrelationship between technology and society – in this discourse technology is either demonized or a panacea. This conference looks for “a way forward that shapes technology to benefit us, building the kind of society we want atop it.” This cannot happen without a set of mature and sensible policy mechanisms at both the domestic and global levels.

With the rapid advancement of digital technologies — such as automation, artificial intelligence, the Internet of Things, and ubiquitous social media platforms — the digital age has transformed the way in which human rights are both exercised, and threatened, globally. This is not because digital technologies themselves are inherently helpful or harmful. Instead, as with other technologies, they serve as tools that can be used to enhance or restrict human rights – but this inevitably depends on policy decisions.

In a ground breaking 2011 report, the United Nations Human Rights Council’s Special Rapporteur on the Promotion and Protection of the Right to Freedom of Opinion and Expression, Frank La Rue, emphasized “the unique and transformative nature of the Internet not only to enable individuals to exercise their right to freedom of opinion and expression, but also a range of other human rights, and to promote the progress of society as a whole.” However, it is unlikely that the architects of the contemporary human rights regime could have foreseen the extent to which technology would fundamentally change the economy, political system and society. The conversation about digital rights needs to evolve; this workshop is designed to facilitate that.

The workshop will address three separate – but interrelated – aspects of data governance and human rights: 1) the data driven economy; 2) smart cities; and, 3) democratic institutions. The pedagogy will be “hands on”. Aaron Shull will facilitate the workshop, but there will be three additional faculty.

  • Dan Ciuriak will lead on the governance of the data driven economy;
  • Bianca Wylie will lead on the governance of smart cities; and,
  • Taylor Owen will lead on data, platforms and democratic institutions.

The three hours will be structured in the following way:

Module 1

  • 15-minute introduction to the data driven economy and the associated policy implications
  • 15-minute group exercise (case study)
  • 15-minute large group debrief and discussion

Module 2

  • 15-minute introduction to smart cities and the associated policy implications
  • 15-minute group exercise (case study)
  • 15-minute large group debrief and discussion

Break

  • 15 minutes

Module 3

  • 15-minute introduction to the challenges of “platform” democracy and the associated policy implications
  • 15-minute group exercise (case study)
  • 15-minute large group debrief and discussion

Module 4

  • 30-minute moderated panel discussion with audience Q&A
Directeur général et conseiller juridique
Centre for International Governance Innovation
Chargé de mission
Centre for International Governance Innovation
Professeur adjoint de médias numériques et d'affaires mondiales
University of British Columbia
Chargé de mission
Centre for International Governance Innovation
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